Church Involvement

Creating a Culture of Involvement in Every Church

Month: February 2018

Transition: A Third Choice

transition4Transition

There are basically two kinds of churches: (1) the growing kind, and (2) the dying kind. Both present challenges. One is more exciting than the other, and one is more depressing than the other. I’ve worked with both kinds and presently, I am working with a growing church.

The reason a dying church is a dying church is because its leadership and members want everything to remain the same. What is ironic about this mindset is that things don’t remain the same for such a church: they deteriorate. Slowly and surely, guests stop visiting, members grow older, new souls aren’t added, people die and before too long, the church has ceased to exist (or at best is barely hanging on).

However, growing churches are constantly changing, growing and going through necessary transitions. Such transitions take place when staff changes, when membership numbers grow, when needs grow, when facility needs change, when individual members grow spiritually, etc. Growing churches are constantly adjusting to new things and new people. This change can also be called ‘transition.’  Transitioning can take place on many levels. The most obvious are in staffing, ministries, attendance and membership expansion. While some of us may be uncomfortable with such things, we need to look at such things as the blessings of church growth and transitioning.

Consider some things about this thing called transition that may help us look at it as a blessing and not as a curse.

Transition Is Normal; We Experience & See It Everyday.   We  have a certain amount of control over the type of transition it is and the speed of the transition.

Transition Is Helpful (when handled properly).   You cannot be timid about transition and you must be wise as it occurs.

Transition Is not an Enemy; Satan is the Enemy.    We’ve all heard the statement, “we shouldn’t change just for change sake.”   I think most of us would agree.   However, any change (and those advocating it) is considered evil by some.   The intent and the basis (is it biblical or not?) of change can be from the Lord or from the devil himself.    Remember that advocates of change are not necessarily the enemy; Satan is the enemy and he is behind any change that is evil.

Transition is neither good nor evil in itself. What got us to the transition state and how it got us there is a moral issue. We cannot, we must not, we should not and we will not compromise the Word of God for any reason. Our numerical and spiritual growth should always be based upon God’s will—and God’s Will makes it plain that we should always be growing.

As we transition we need to do so gracefully and in a Christ like manner.

Trav

Recommended reading:  Transitions Making Sense of Life’s Changes by William Bridges (subtitled: Strategies for Coping with the Difficult, Painful and Confusing Times in Your Life).

 

Why Volunteers Quit & How to Prevent It

Why Volunteers Quit & How to Prevent It

Discover why volunteers quit–and what to do about it.

John just filled the last Sunday school teacher slot. He heaves a sigh of relief. Now he can sit back and relax. But not for long. The next week, one of the volunteers calls. She says she can’t teach the first- and second-graders anymore. “Here we go again,” John thinks.

Do you share John’s frustration? Just when you have all your volunteer slots filled, some volunteers quit. Why does this happen?

WHY VOLUNTEERS QUIT Quitters aren’t lazy or uncommitted; they often have valid reasons for quitting.

  1. Volunteers aren’t challenged. Volunteers need to feel they’re getting something in return for their work. For example, if you ask school teachers to teach the same grade at church as they do in school, they’re doing something they’ve always done. And they aren’t challenged by anything new.”If you try to make [volunteering]too easy, you just cut the legs out of it,” says Dr. Cynthia Thero, former president of The Source International, an educational development firm. Marlene Wilson, who conducts workshops and conferences on volunteerism and is the author of How to Mobilize Church Volunteers (Augsburg), agrees, “Sometimes we recruit people and we don’t give them anything really significant to do. So it’s a waste of their time. With dual-career marriages and single parenting, people want whatever time they give to make a difference.”
  2. Volunteers don’t have a job description. “People don’t dare say yes to something they don’t know what they’re committing to,” says Wilson. Even the secular sector considers job descriptions important to get volunteer support. A Maryland school puts a detailed list of “volunteer opportunities”-including tasks and dates for special events-right on the student information form that parents receive when enrolling their children.
  3. Volunteers aren’t sure of their performance. Volunteers want to know they make a difference. They want to know how the program is better or different because of their volunteering. “[Volunteers] leave the program because no one evaluates their impact,” says Thero.
  4. Volunteers aren’t trained. “Volunteers quit because they say yes to something and assume that somebody is going to train and support them,” says Wilson. “But they find they are thrown out there on their own.”Thero affirms, “How good the program is depends on the training.”

HOW TO KEEP VOLUNTEERS Even though volunteers often check out for good reasons, there’s good news. You can ensure long-term, satisfied volunteers in your ministry.

  1. Know what your volunteers want. Develop an interview process. Ask volunteers: What expertise do you bring to the program? What do you need out of this experience? What are your goals in working with children? “Help volunteers understand that they need the experience,” says Thero.
  2. Understand current trends. “Two-thirds of volunteers work outside the home,” says Wilson. “A lot are part of the sandwich generation and inheriting additional family responsibilities [from elderly parents].” Consider shared leadership or shorter time slots to lighten volunteers’ loads.
  3. Develop a clear job description. Give detailed descriptions of specific tasks, such as leading children’s singing for one-half hour each Sunday morning. State how much time the position requires, including training time. Specify a finite term of service.
  4. Train. Volunteers want good training to succeed in their job. But how do you know when you’ve had a good training session? Ask yourself: Do people give all kinds of excuses not to come? Do volunteers drop out? Ask volunteers: What do you wish you knew? What do you need to know to be effective in your job?
  5. Devote Time to Your Volunteers Pour into the hearts of your volunteers. Thank them for their faithful service, and inspire those who are just jumping into volunteering. By reaffirming their personal calling of investing in children, you’ll spark a renewed passion for what you are doing in your children’s ministry. It’s so easy with Children’s Ministry Local Training. When you train your volunteers, they experience greater satisfaction in their service. They’re happier. And a happy volunteer is a volunteer who stays around for years and years.
  6. What Is Children’s Ministry Local Training?

Children’s Ministry Local Training is a four-hour, power-packed local training event that’s hosted at different churches throughout America. You and your team will grow closer together while you draw nearer to the heart of Jesus and take in what it really means to give hope to our next generation. This isn’t a sit-and-listen kind of training. This experience is fun, interactive, and practical. It’s perfect to apply right away in your children’s ministry. You and your team will leave refreshed, inspired, and motivated.

Children’s Ministry Magazine is the most read magazine for people who minister to children from birth through sixth grade. We’re partnering with you to make Jesus irresistible to kids.

 

 

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